Wage & Hour

  • May 06, 2024

    Mass. Justices Wary Of Spiking Uber, Lyft Ballot Questions

    Justices on Massachusetts' highest court appeared unlikely Monday to strike down ballot proposals to reinvent app-based drivers' relationships with Uber, Lyft and the like, commenting that the scattershot ideas for voters in March all carry the underlying theme of creating a carveout from the state's worker-friendly employee classification law.

  • May 06, 2024

    Amazon Contractor Suits To Reopen After Justices Skip Cases

    Two related long-running lawsuits claiming Amazon misclassified drivers as independent contractors instead of employees will likely resume after a Washington federal judge said lifting a stay would be appropriate in light of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision not to hear two matters that might have impacted the misclassification cases.

  • May 06, 2024

    Ritz-Carlton Defeats Post-Hurricane Layoff Claims At 1st Circ.

    The First Circuit has said a Puerto Rico federal judge was right to rule in favor of a Ritz-Carlton hotel in a suit by a proposed class of employees who claimed they were wrongfully laid off after the island was decimated by back-to-back hurricanes in 2017.

  • May 06, 2024

    Amazon Workers Answer Judge's $5.5M COVID Deal Inquiries

    Amazon employees assured a California federal court that their $5.5 million proposed class action deal is fit for approval, giving additional information on the terms and saying the company backed ending the lawsuit accusing the e-commerce giant of failing to pay for time spent undergoing COVID screenings before shifts.

  • May 06, 2024

    FDIC, OCC Gear Up For Another Shot At Banker Bonus Rules

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency on Monday revived an Obama-era proposal to set restrictions on incentive-based pay for executives at big banks, a lingering item of unfinished Dodd-Frank Act business, and for now, the Federal Reserve is sitting out.

  • May 06, 2024

    College Football Players Assoc. Eyes Athlete Protection Bill

    The College Football Players Association will meet this week with lawmakers in Washington, D.C., to craft legislation that gives athletes certain worker protections and collective bargaining rights but stops short of classifying them as full employees, the organization said Monday.

  • May 06, 2024

    Gerdau Steel Settles Fathers' Parental Leave Suit In Texas

    A suit accusing steel producer Gerdau of not allowing male mill workers to take parental leave will be put to rest after a Texas federal judge signed off on a nationwide deal between the workers and the company.

  • May 06, 2024

    Ex-Morgan & Morgan Paralegal Hits Firm With FMLA Suit

    A former Morgan & Morgan PA paralegal who says she was unlawfully fired after requesting time off under protections afforded by the Family and Medical Leave Act has sued the firm in Florida federal court, alleging interference and retaliation.

  • May 06, 2024

    Mortgage Brokers Go After Fla. Bank For OT Pay

    A Florida bank hasn't been paying its mortgage brokers time-and-a-half premiums even though they were not exempt from overtime laws and routinely worked between 50 and 70 hours per week, three former workers for the bank said in a proposed collective action in federal court.

  • May 03, 2024

    NLRB Threats May Lurk In Litigation Questioning

    A handful of recent decisions out of the National Labor Relations Board offer employers a reminder that they may risk labor lawsuits if they probe workers' conversations with colleagues or unions to bolster their cases in wage suits, challenges to union elections and other litigation.

  • May 03, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Weighs Class Cert. In Tax Prep OT Case

    In the coming week, a federal magistrate judge will consider whether to grant class certification to New York income tax preparers who claim they were denied overtime pay due to their employer's practice of paying them on commissions. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ex-Spirit Flight Attendant Drops FMLA Suit

    A Florida federal judge on Friday dismissed a lawsuit a former flight attendant lodged against Spirit Airlines accusing it of firing her after she complained that its medical leave policies ran afoul of the Family and Medical Leave Act.

  • May 03, 2024

    Arbitration Exemption Doesn't Cover Cos., Conn. Judge Rules

    Two food distributors who created corporate entities while working for a food service business must arbitrate claims they were misclassified as independent contractors because a Federal Arbitration Act carveout doesn't apply to businesses, a Connecticut federal judge has ruled.

  • May 03, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Justices To Hear PAGA Intervenor Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for oral arguments before the California Supreme Court on the issue of the right of workers bringing a case under the state's Private Attorneys General Act to intervene in a separate matter. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in the Golden State.

  • May 03, 2024

    Calif. Appeals Court Revives Joint Employment Claims

    A California state appeals court in a rehearing declined to sustain demurrers a lower court had granted to several companies that argued they could not be sued as joint employers in a worker's wage and hour lawsuit, finding the worker's claim had enough evidence to take shape.

  • May 03, 2024

    Group Home Co. To Pay $191K Deal To End DOL Wage Suit

    An operator of group homes for people with disabilities will shell out approximately $191,000 to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit claiming it failed to pay workers minimum wage and overtime, as a Michigan federal judge signed off on the deal Friday. 

  • May 03, 2024

    Workers Seek to Block Bimbo Bakeries' Quick Appeal

    Delivery drivers asked a Vermont federal judge not to grant Bimbo Bakeries' bid to appeal a decision that their collective can span three states, saying it's too early to get the Second Circuit's opinion because the collective members haven't even opted into the misclassification suit yet.

  • May 03, 2024

    Mass. Wage-Hour Debates To Intensify In Courts, On Ballots

    Massachusetts is a hot spot for wage and hour issues, with state courts approaching decisions in gig worker battles and voters potentially weighing in this fall on proposed statewide measures regarding app-based drivers and the tipped minimum wage. Here, Law360 explores three key issues to watch.

  • May 02, 2024

    Sysco Unit To Provide Back Pay To End DOL Hiring Bias Probe

    A subsidiary of restaurant food distributor Sysco Corp. will pay over $133,000 in back pay to resolve the U.S. Department of Labor's allegations that it discriminated against women by failing to hire qualified female applicants to fill open warehouse positions in Palmetto, Florida, the agency said Thursday.

  • May 02, 2024

    DaVita Says Nurses Trying Go Around Wage Rulings

    Nationwide kidney care service provider DaVita Inc. has urged a Colorado federal judge to reject a bid by nurses and technicians to merge their wage class action with another suit, arguing Wednesday the plaintiffs are seeking to "circumvent" earlier rulings limiting the case's reach.

  • May 02, 2024

    Poultry Cos. To Pay $5.1M Settling OT, Child Labor Violations

    A network of California poultry processors will pay over $5 million to settle a U.S. Department of Labor lawsuit in federal court after an agency investigation found the processors employed children to debone poultry and failed to pay over 475 workers overtime.

  • May 02, 2024

    Drivers' Calif. Wage Class Action Tossed For Taking Too Long

    A California state court rightly tossed a class action by two drivers accusing a transportation company of wage violations, a state appeals panel ruled, backing the lower court's finding that the case likely would not have been able to proceed to trial within five years of the complaint being filed.

  • May 02, 2024

    Full 11th Circ. Won't Look At Golf Workers Volunteer Decision

    The full Eleventh Circuit won't weigh in on a panel's ruling that a Florida county wasn't three golf course attendants' employer, denying on Thursday the workers' bid for rehearing.

  • May 02, 2024

    How Wage Cases Are Changing Federal Arbitration

    Over the past month, the scope of a federal exemption to arbitration has evolved as appellate courts have refined an important access point for workers to pursue their claims in court. Here, Law360 looks at several cases that have recently made waves in federal arbitration.

  • May 02, 2024

    Seyfarth Litigator Pairs Up With Solo Atty At Atlanta Firm

    A former Seyfarth Shaw LLP partner has joined a solo practitioner's employment law firm in Atlanta with the goal of handling plaintiffs employment litigation and trade secret and noncompete matters while capitalizing on the use of generative artificial intelligence.

Expert Analysis

  • Calif. Cos. May Have To Reimburse More Remote Work Costs

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    After a California appeals court's recent decision in Thai v. IBM, countless California employers will be required to pay work-related costs incurred by their employees who were sent home during the pandemic, and this could be just the beginning of a reckoning, say Sonya Goodwin at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

  • Calif. Employers Note: Industrial Welfare Commission Is Back

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    An appropriations bill recently passed in California instructs the Industrial Welfare Commission to reconvene for the first time in 19 years, opening a door for the regulatory body to significantly affect employer operations by strengthening standards for meal and rest breaks, scheduling, record-keeping, and more, say Denisha McKenzie and John Keeney at CDF Labor Law.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Colorado Antitrust Reform Carries Broad State Impact

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    Colorado recently became the latest state to update and expand its antitrust laws, and the new act may significantly affect enforcement and private litigation, particularly when it comes to workers and consumers, says Diane Hazel at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Tips For Fighting Back Against Explosive Verdicts

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    Massive jury verdicts are a product of our time, driven in part by reptile tactics, but employers can build a strategic defense to mitigate the risk of a runaway jury, and develop tools to seek judicial relief in the event of an adverse outcome, say Dawn Solowey and Lynn Kappelman at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Not A Total Loss For Employer Arbitration

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    Contrary to the conclusion reached in a recent Law360 guest article, the California Supreme Court’s ruling in Adolph v. Uber Technologies did not diminish the benefit of arbitrating employees’ individual Private Attorneys General Act claims, as the very limited ruling does not undermine U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Steven Katz at Constangy.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Changing Status Quo In A Union Shop

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    A recent administrative law decision concerning a dispute between Fortune Media and the NewsGuild of New York is an important reminder to employers with unionized workforces to refrain from making unilateral updates to employee handbooks that will change the terms and conditions of employment, says Jennifer Hataway at Butler Snow.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Shift In Religious Accommodation Law

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    The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Groff v. DeJoy is making it more difficult for employers to deny religious accommodations, and there are three takeaways employers should keep in mind, say William Cook and Matthew High at Wilson Elser.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Devalues Arbitration For Employers

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent opinion in Adolph v. Uber may lessen employers' appetites for arbitration under the state’s Private Attorneys General Act, because arbitrating an allegedly aggrieved employee’s individual claims is unlikely to dispose of their nonindividual claims, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Understanding Illinois' Temp Worker Obligation Updates

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    Recent amendments to the Illinois Day and Temporary Labor Services Act would significantly expand the protection for temporary workers in the state, impose new compliance obligations on staffing agencies and their client companies, and add significant enforcement teeth to the act, say Nicholas Anaclerio and Ellie Hemminger at Vedder Price.

  • How End Of Forced Arb. Is Affecting Sex Harassment Cases

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    A little over a year after the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault Act became effective, we have started seeing substantive interpretation of the EFAA, almost exclusively from the U.S. district courts in New York, and there are two key takeaways for employers, says Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.