Illinois

  • April 25, 2024

    DOJ Pressed On Prosecutions Of Muslim Asylum-Seekers

    The U.S. Department of Justice is facing new questions from Capitol Hill over prosecutions of Muslim asylum-seekers in the wake of a Los Angeles Times report showing that migrants from majority-Muslim countries were disproportionately imprisoned at the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas.

  • April 25, 2024

    Wendy's Beats Negligence Suit Over Drive-Thru Shooting

    Wendy's permanently defeated a negligence suit accusing it of failing to prevent the shooting of a man in December 2018 at its drive-through by not having adequate security guards, after an Illinois federal judge said Wednesday the burger chain couldn't have reasonably foreseen that the shooting would occur.

  • April 25, 2024

    Judge Reopens Allstate Trade Secrets Case Against Ex-Agent

    A Colorado federal judge has partially reopened a case alleging that a former Allstate exclusive agent poached customers for another agency, directing the ex-agent to explain why he shouldn't be held in contempt in the lawsuit.

  • April 25, 2024

    Stryker Says Sanctions Bid Goes 'Galaxies Beyond' Law

    Medical device maker Stryker urged a Colorado federal judge to reject an ex-distributor's latest request for sanctions, arguing in a brief that the distributor's $2.2 million bid goes "galaxies beyond" what it asked for at trial and what the Tenth Circuit said the court could entertain.

  • April 25, 2024

    South African's Old Convictions Cost Him Deportation Relief

    The Seventh Circuit ruled that an immigration judge appropriately considered two criminal convictions in 2000 and 2002 to deny a South African man's 2015 efforts to stay in the country.

  • April 25, 2024

    7th Circ. OKs Pausing Nail Polish IP Suit For Ownership Fight

    A company registered in New Jersey that sells nail polish has failed to persuade a federal appeals court to let it move ahead with its trade secrets case in a Chicago federal court against its former business partners in China until first resolving an ownership dispute "lurking just beneath the surface."

  • April 25, 2024

    Judge Decries Discovery Delay In Chicago Genetic-Bias Fight

    An Illinois federal judge has warned a proposed class of Chicago employees that further discovery delays in their suit alleging a city wellness program intentionally discriminated against them on the basis of their genetic information could result in the court barring witnesses' testimony from the case.

  • April 25, 2024

    Judge Questions Equal Payouts In $9M White Castle BIPA Deal

    An Illinois federal judge said Thursday he would grant preliminary approval to a $9.4 million settlement resolving a class action targeting White Castle's biometric timekeeping practices but added he wants more information on why all employees are poised to receive the same recovery regardless of how long they worked there.

  • April 25, 2024

    Deals Rumor Mill: Paramount, Salesforce, ShipBob

    Sony and Apollo Global Management may make a joint bid for Paramount Global, Salesforce Inc. has abandoned its effort to potentially buy data-management software company Informatica, and e-commerce fulfillment service provider ShipBob Inc. is readying an IPO. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other notable deal rumors from the past week.

  • April 25, 2024

    Becton BIPA Suit Gets Cut Short Under Health Exception

    An Illinois federal judge permanently tossed a Chicago health worker's biometric privacy claims targeting Becton Dickinson and Co.'s drug dispensing cabinets, saying his arguments for putting distance between his case and foreclosing precedent "border on the frivolous."

  • April 25, 2024

    Kirkland Guides $2.7B PE Deal For Wealth Management Tech

    U.S. private equity firm GTCR said Thursday it has agreed to buy AssetMark, a prominent wealth management technology platform, for approximately $2.7 billion, as the U.S. private equity firm moves to strengthen its presence in the sector.

  • April 24, 2024

    Ill. Woman Gets 18 Months For Role In $16M COVID Aid Theft

    An Illinois federal judge sentenced a woman to 18 months in prison on Wednesday for her "supporting role" in a scheme to fraudulently obtain at least $16 million in federal coronavirus-relief small business loans, saying that while she wasn't the ringleader of the fraud, she still committed a "crime of greed."

  • April 24, 2024

    Foxtrot, Dom's Kitchen Closures Violate WARN Act, Suit Says

    Former employees of Foxtrot Market and Dom's Kitchen & Market hit the stores' parent company with a lawsuit in Illinois federal court Thursday, alleging it failed to give workers 60 days' notice of mass layoffs as required by federal law when all 33 locations abruptly shuttered Tuesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    Investors Can't Hit Reset In 737 Max Fraud Suit, Boeing Says

    Investors claiming Boeing wiped out billions in stock value by misrepresenting the 737 Max's safety shouldn't be allowed to "effectively hit the reset button" and pursue an amended complaint that relies on statements already deemed inactionable, the aerospace giant argued Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    Chicago Museum Accuses New York DA Of Art Seizure Overreach

    The Art Institute of Chicago has urged a New York criminal court to give back an Egon Schiele drawing seized by the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, saying the artwork was never looted by Nazis and prosecutors have no business litigating a civil ownership dispute.

  • April 24, 2024

    7th Circ. Revives Suit Over Paper Co.'s ESOP Valuation

    The Seventh Circuit reopened a suit claiming executives at a defunct paper company and financial advisers overvalued the business to persuade workers to put retirement savings into an employee stock ownership plan, saying a lower court viewed the allegations too narrowly when it tossed the case.

  • April 24, 2024

    Ex-Kirkland M&A Atty Joins Greenberg Traurig In Chicago

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has announced the hiring of a former Kirkland & Ellis LLP attorney in Chicago as the latest shareholder in its mergers and acquisitions and private equity practices.

  • April 24, 2024

    Biden's Latest Judge Picks Include Blocked US Atty Nom

    President Joe Biden announced seven judicial nominee picks on Wednesday, including one for the Northern District of Illinois, which covers Chicago, whom he previously nominated to be U.S. attorney for the district, but has been held up by a Republican senator.

  • April 23, 2024

    $12M Chicago Toxic Demolition Settlement Receives Final OK

    An Illinois federal judge gave his final blessing to a group of Chicago residents' $12.25 million settlement with a developer and several contractors that allegedly covered a neighborhood in potentially toxic dust during a smokestack demolition.

  • April 23, 2024

    Biz Owner Faces Second Jury Over Alleged VA Kickback Plot

    An Illinois business owner faced his second federal jury Tuesday as prosecutors asserted he should be convicted of wire fraud for paying kickbacks to a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs clerk in exchange for medical equipment business that included "bogus" rental fees.

  • April 23, 2024

    Blue States Leap To Defend EPA Vehicle Emissions Rule

    California and 21 other blue states, along with a smattering of cities and the District of Columbia, have told the D.C. Circuit that they want to help the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency defend its rule requiring reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from cars, trucks and vans from legal attack by red states.

  • April 23, 2024

    Sugar Giants Accused Of Using Shadow Analyst To Fix Prices

    A putative class action filed in Illinois federal court on Monday accuses top sugar producers of colluding with each other since at least 2019 to illegally fix the price for white, refined table sugar, driving up the prices of granulated sugar since in "one of the steepest climbs ever."

  • April 23, 2024

    Downtown Chicago Hotel Hits Ch. 11 With Up To $50M In Debt

    A defunct hotel near Chicago's commercial center has applied for Chapter 11 protection in Delaware bankruptcy court, disclosing between $10 million and $50 million in debt, a few months after the city government converted the property into a shelter for unhoused people.

  • April 23, 2024

    Why A New York Federal Judge 'Loves' Discovery Disputes

    While discovery disputes can be a frustration for many judges and attorneys, U.S. District Judge Denise L. Cote says that she loves them because they teach her a lot about the cases she is overseeing, the parties involved and the attorneys working on them.

  • April 22, 2024

    Amazon Illegally Gathered Workers' Face Scans, Suit Says

    Amazon.com Services faces a proposed class action filed Monday in Illinois federal court accusing the retail giant of gathering employees' facial geometry scans and sharing them with various third parties without first receiving the employees' written consent in violation of the Illinois Biometric Privacy Act.

Expert Analysis

  • A Closer Look At The Federal Criminal Enforcement Slump

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    Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, now at King & Spalding, explains that the U.S. Department of Justice’s statistical reports reveal that federal authorities are considerably less productive today than in the past, as criminal prosecutions fell in 2022 in every major category, for reasons that are not entirely clear.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Ill. Justices Set New Standard For Analyzing Defect Claims

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling in Acuity v. M/I Homes of Chicago has effectively changed the landscape for how insurers may respond to construction defect claims in the state, so insurers should carefully focus their coverage analysis on whether the business risk exclusions are applicable, say Bevin Carroll and Julie Klein at Kennedys.

  • A Look At Consumer Reporting In 2023, And What's To Come

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    The legal landscape of consumer reporting is evolving as courts, federal regulators and state legislatures continue to weigh in — and while last year may have seen a slight downtick in the overall volume of Fair Credit Reporting Act litigation, 2024 is set to be a watershed year for this area of the law, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • Ill. BIPA Ruling May Spark Violation-Of-Law Exclusion Fight

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    An Illinois appeals court's recent holding in National Fire Insurance v. Visual Pak that a violation-of-law exclusion didn't preclude coverage for an underlying Biometric Information Privacy Act suit contradicts an earlier Seventh Circuit decision that aligns with long-standing insurance law principles — which may lead the state's high court to weigh in, says Tae Andrews at Pasich.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

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    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Lessons Learned From 2023's Top ADA Decisions

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    This year saw the courts delving into the complexities of employee accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act in the post-pandemic workplace, going beyond bright-line rules with fact-intensive inquiries that are likely to create uncertainty for employers, says Linda Dwoskin at Dechert.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • 10 Steps To Reduce Risks From AI Employment Tools

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    In light of the White House’s recent executive order on responsible use of artificial intelligence, companies using AI tools to make employment decisions should take steps to understand and mitigate the legal risks posed by these products and keep up with the rapidly evolving regulations that govern them, say attorneys at Cooley.

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