Ohio

  • May 15, 2024

    Two Firms To Lead GrafTech Suit Over Environmental Issues

    An Ohio federal judge on Wednesday appointed Abraham Fruchter & Twersky LLP and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP to lead a shareholder class action against GrafTech International, accusing the electrode-maker of covering up its environmental contamination in Monterrey, Mexico, in the run-up to its initial public offering.

  • May 15, 2024

    6th Circ. Frees Ex-Ohio Pol Pending Bribery Appeal

    A former member of the Cincinnati City Council convicted of bribery and attempted extortion in connection with a sports betting redevelopment project spearheaded by a former Cincinnati Bengals player can stay out of prison while an appeal plays out, the Sixth Circuit said Wednesday.

  • May 15, 2024

    Law Firm Urges Reversal Of Malpractice Arbitration Award

    The Ferraro Law Firm urged a Florida appeals court Wednesday to reverse a trial court order upholding a $1.5 million arbitration award against it over alleged malpractice, arguing that its opponent and former client improperly got a successor trial judge to reverse course after the first one vacated the arbitration ruling.

  • May 15, 2024

    Startup Consultant Hits Hemp Co. With $2.1M Fee Suit

    A consulting firm focused on helping startup companies raise capital is taking an industrial hemp firm, its owners and a guest lecturer at the University of Michigan's business school to Ohio federal court over $2.1 million in consulting fees it says it never got to collect.

  • May 15, 2024

    House Judiciary Chair Seeks Docs On IRS Backdating Probe

    The House Judiciary Committee's Republican chairman asked an IRS watchdog to reveal findings from investigations into allegations of IRS employee misconduct, including in a high-profile $38 million conservation easement deduction case in which the agency admitted to backdating evidence.

  • May 14, 2024

    Bedsheet Buyer Attys Clinch $3.5M Fee For Macy's Deal

    Lawyers representing a class of consumers that accused Macy's of lying about the thread count of its sheets will get $3.5 million as part of a $10.5 million settlement with the retailer, an Ohio federal judge ruled, but gave the lead plaintiffs a pittance, saying they did not work hard enough to get more.

  • May 14, 2024

    Fighters Likely Killed Victims In Chiquita Case, Academic Says

    A Colorado professor took the stand Tuesday in Chiquita's trial over accusations that it financed a right-wing Colombian paramilitary group that committed war crimes against civilians, testifying in Florida federal court that it was "extremely likely" the militants killed several men whose deaths family members blame on the banana company.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ex-Wachovia Exec Owes $9M For Decade-Old Fraud, Feds Say

    A former senior trading executive-turned-Christian novelist still owes over $9 million in restitution on a 17-year-old conviction for a Ponzi-like scheme he ran while working for what was then Wachovia's investment banking unit, according to federal prosecutors.

  • May 14, 2024

    Trump Attys Trying To Delay Paying Sanctions, Mich. Says

    Michigan officials and the city of Detroit say former Trump campaign lawyer Sidney Powell and other attorneys should be penalized with another round of sanctions for apparently attempting to put off paying a hefty sanctions award imposed in a lawsuit challenging the state's 2020 presidential election results.

  • May 14, 2024

    New Ruling Aids In-Court 401(k) Suit Bid, DOL Tells 6th Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged the Sixth Circuit to heed a decision out of the Second Circuit refusing to compel arbitration in a federal benefits lawsuit, arguing that the appellate panel should join four other circuits in rejecting an employer's attempt to force claims out of court.

  • May 14, 2024

    Republican AGs Say EEOC Harassment Guidance Oversteps

    A coalition of 18 Republican state attorneys general asked a Tennessee federal judge to scrap recently finalized guidance on workplace harassment issued by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, arguing its protections surrounding gender identity amount to government overreach.

  • May 13, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Toss Of Private Security Co.'s Stolen Info Suit

    A Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals panel has sided with a private security company accused of partnering with a similar business and stealing trade secrets so it could flourish while the other one wilted, saying the plaintiff failed to support its allegations.

  • May 13, 2024

    Kroger Says Wash. AG's Merger Suit Ignores Costco's Impact

    The Washington state attorney general's challenge to Kroger's proposed $24.6 billion acquisition of rival grocery giant Albertsons ignores key economic realities, the companies argued in recent state court filings, including fierce competition from Costco and other big-box retailers.

  • May 13, 2024

    Zuckerberg Challenges Basis Of Personal Claims In Meta MDL

    Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is asking a California federal court to throw out claims against him in multidistrict litigation over social media platforms' allegedly addictive design, saying the personal injury plaintiffs haven't shown he took affirmative actions that would make him personally liable.

  • May 13, 2024

    Assault Exclusion Dooms Restaurant's Coverage For Murder

    An insurer doesn't have to indemnify a Detroit restaurant accused of contributing to the 2019 shooting death of a potential patron by failing to provide adequate security, the Sixth Circuit said.

  • May 13, 2024

    Nursing Home Says Buyer's Lease Silence Endangers Future

    An Ohio-based nursing home operator claimed Monday that its Pickaway County nursing home is in "imminent danger" because the company's owners are threatening the licensing and management of the nursing home by refusing to acknowledge terminated leases and not making the transition to a new lessee and operator.

  • May 11, 2024

    Alito Warns Freedoms Of Speech, Religion Are In Danger

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito warned Saturday that support for freedom of speech on college campuses is "dangerously" low, and that freedom of religion is in peril nationwide.

  • May 10, 2024

    Insurers Don't Owe Chiquita Coverage In Terrorism Settlement

    An Ohio state appeals court ruled Friday that Chiquita Brands International Inc. is not owed coverage by a group of insurers for a settlement with families of six Americans killed by a terrorist group Chiquita had paid for protection, saying any errors the trial court made were harmless because it came to the correct conclusion.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fuzzy Jurisdiction In Web Cases Has 1st Circ. Judge 'Worried'

    A First Circuit judge has said uncertainty over how personal jurisdiction rules apply to cases involving the borderless internet may require action from Congress or the U.S. Supreme Court, expressing concern that website operators can "manipulate" the legal requirement in order to avoid accountability.

  • May 10, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs NLRB In Union Rep. Discipline Case

    A tape manufacturer's decision to punish two Michigan employees for not adequately cleaning their work areas was motivated by animus toward their actions as a union steward and a union committee member, the Sixth Circuit found, upholding a National Labor Relations Board ruling.

  • May 09, 2024

    Amazon, Walmart Face Dem Questions Over 'Dynamic Pricing'

    Senate Banking Committee Chair Sherrod Brown on Thursday raised concerns to Amazon and Walmart about corporations hiking prices by exploiting customer data and pricing algorithms, saying it undermines consumers' ability to comparison shop and save money.

  • May 09, 2024

    Red States, Electric Co-Ops Challenge EPA Power Plant Rules

    Twenty-seven Republican-led states and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association called on the D.C. Circuit Thursday to unravel the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new source performance standards for greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric generating units.

  • May 09, 2024

    GOP Sens. Call Biden's Bluff On US Steel-Nippon

    Three Republican senators urged President Joe Biden on Thursday to block Nippon Steel's planned $14.9 billion acquisition of U.S. Steel, calling his prior comments opposing the deal "worthless" while claiming he has the authority to terminate the deal immediately under laws that address "a national emergency." 

  • May 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Panel Skeptical Of NLRB Hazard Pay Ruling

    A Sixth Circuit panel questioned on Thursday a National Labor Relations Board decision finding a Michigan nursing home violated federal labor law with its handling of temporary hazard pay and staffing during the COVID-19 pandemic, with judges appearing skeptical the company had to bargain over the changes.

  • May 09, 2024

    Mobile Carriers Pay $10M To End 50 AGs' Deceptive Ad Claims

    A coalition of nearly all the country's state attorneys general on Thursday announced $10.25 million in settlements that AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile have agreed to pay to end a multistate probe into the wireless carriers' allegedly misleading advertising practices.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • Opinion

    High Court Should Settle Circuit Split On Risk Disclosures

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    The U.S. Supreme Court should grant the petition for writ of certiorari in the Facebook case to resolve a growing circuit split concerning when risk disclosures can be misleading under federal securities laws, and its decision should align with the intent of Congress and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, says Richard Zelichov at DLA Piper.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: Benefits Of MDL Transfers

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    A recent order from the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation highlights a critical part of the panel's work — moving cases into an existing MDL — and serves as a reminder that common arguments against such transfers don't outweigh the benefits of coordinating discovery and utilizing lead counsel, says Alan Rothman at Sidley Austin.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • The Challenges SEC's Climate Disclosure Rule May Face

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    Attorneys at Debevoise examine potential legal challenges to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's new climate-related disclosure rule — against which nine suits have already been filed — including arguments under the Administrative Procedure Act, the major questions doctrine, the First Amendment and the nondelegation doctrine.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • Risks Of Nonmutual Offensive Collateral Estoppel In MDLs

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    After the Supreme Court declined to review the Sixth Circuit's ruling in the E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. personal injury litigation, nonmutual offensive collateral estoppel could show up in more MDLs, and transform the loss of a single MDL bellwether trial into a de facto classwide decision that binds thousands of other MDL cases, say Chantale Fiebig and Luke Sullivan at Weil Gotshal.

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