Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • June 25, 2024

    Schouest Bamdas Opens Dallas Office With Six-Partner Hire

    Schouest Bamdas Soshea BenMaier & Eastham PLLC has expanded its footprint in Texas by launching a new office in Dallas with six new partners from Hartline Barger LLP, it said in an official announcement Tuesday.

  • June 25, 2024

    USA Swimming Indemnity Suit Against Watchdog Stays Afloat

    A nonprofit watchdog cannot escape possible financial ramifications related to a botched investigation into false sexual misconduct accusations, after a Colorado state judge ruled it must face an indemnification lawsuit brought by USA Swimming after the accused boy's mother sued the organization.  

  • June 25, 2024

    Atlanta City Council To Consider $2M Settlement In Taser Case

    Atlanta's City Council is set to consider a $2 million settlement next week in a case in which two college students allege they were pulled from their car and Tasers used on them by police in 2020 during protests related to the police killing of George Floyd.

  • June 24, 2024

    Chevron's $120M Trial Loss Reinstated By Calif. Appeals Court

    A California appellate court says Chevron cannot get another trial after a jury found it liable for the negligent operation of an oil field, overturning a lower court's ruling that the company was entitled to a new trial because a juror failed to disclose a decades-old criminal conviction.

  • June 24, 2024

    PacifiCorp To Pay Another $150M To Resolve Wildfire Claims

    PacifiCorp will shell out another $150 million to roughly 380 plaintiffs resolving "substantially all individual claims" stemming from the 2020 Slater wildfire in California, the company announced Monday, adding to the hundreds of millions of dollars the utility has already paid over wildfire-related claims.

  • June 24, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Revive Texas' Homemade Gun-Silencer Fight

    The Fifth Circuit refused Friday to revive a challenge by Texas residents and attorney general against federal laws regulating the manufacturing of firearm silencers, finding the residents lack standing, since vague intentions to make silencers aren't enough to establish injury, and the state can't voluntarily litigate its residents' personal claims.

  • June 24, 2024

    Lloyd's Seeks To Avoid Coverage For Beach Umbrella Death

    Certain underwriters at Lloyd's, London told a South Carolina federal court Monday they should have no coverage obligations to a vacation rental owner over a wrongful death suit alleging that a woman was impaled by a "wind-driven" beach umbrella.

  • June 24, 2024

    Baldwin Awaits Ruling On Bid To Toss 'Rust' Shooting Case

    A New Mexico state judge is set to rule this week on Alec Baldwin's argument that his indictment on involuntary manslaughter charges over the "Rust" film shooting should be thrown out because forensic tests damaged the actor's gun, a key piece of evidence in the case.

  • June 24, 2024

    Boeing Says Turbulent Securities Suit Should Be Dismissed

    Boeing has moved to dismiss a proposed securities fraud suit in Virginia federal court accusing it of misleading investors about the overall safety of its 737 Max jets, saying that the plaintiffs' "kitchen-sink" approach falls short of pleading requirements.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Undo Terror Victims' Win, Citing Twitter Decision

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday swept aside a D.C. Circuit ruling that threatened to expose major pharmaceutical companies to liability for terrorist attacks that injured or killed hundreds of U.S. soldiers and civilians in Iraq.

  • June 24, 2024

    8th Circ. Sides With Minn. DOT In Injured Worker's ADA Suit

    The Eighth Circuit on Monday backed the Minnesota Department of Transportation in a suit by a former mechanic who alleged the agency discriminated against him after an on-the-job injury, finding MNDOT reasonably showed that he could not do the work of his prior position.

  • June 24, 2024

    Harvard Fertility Doctor Settles Secret-Impregnation Claim

    A fertility doctor and longtime Harvard Medical School professor has settled claims that he secretly used his own sperm to impregnate a patient in 1980, according to a Monday court filing.

  • June 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Asks Wash. Justices If Uber Had Duty To Slain Driver

    The Ninth Circuit urged Washington's highest court Monday to determine whether Uber had a duty to use reasonable care to protect one of its drivers who was murdered in a carjacking, in an order that paused an appeal brought by the driver's family.

  • June 24, 2024

    Red Roof Ignored Years Of Trafficking, Victim Tells Ga. Jurors

    The corporate owners of two metro Atlanta Red Roof Inn locations knew about and ignored trafficking at the hotels, a woman who said she had been trafficked at the two hotels and others in the surrounding area for six years told Georgia federal jurors Monday.

  • June 24, 2024

    Suit Over Medical Screws Filed Too Late, Texas Panel Finds

    A Texas appeals court won't revive a woman's suit against BioPro Inc. alleging that surgical screws used in her feet were defective, saying the evidence establishes that she filed her suit after the two-year statute of limitations had expired.

  • June 24, 2024

    Seyfarth Atty Dropped From Yeshiva U. Rape Cover-Up Suit

    A female Yeshiva University student who claims she was raped by a player on the men's basketball team, then sued the school claiming it conspired on a cover-up with Seyfarth Shaw LLP, has voluntarily dismissed two Yeshiva officials and a Seyfarth attorney from the lawsuit.

  • June 24, 2024

    No Coverage For $3M Logging Injury Verdict, 4th Circ. Affirms

    The Fourth Circuit has affirmed that an insurer doesn't have to cover a $3 million jury verdict over a man's logging injuries, finding that a North Carolina federal court correctly decided that a broad worker injury exclusion was applicable.

  • June 24, 2024

    US DOT Final Rule Ups Freight Rail Hazmat Disclosures

    Freight railroads must provide more detailed, real-time information on trains transporting hazardous materials to state and local first responders, under a new U.S. Department of Transportation final rule announced Monday that was largely spurred by last year's fiery derailment in East Palestine, Ohio.

  • June 24, 2024

    $12.8M Deal Ending Some Chiquita MDL Claims Gets Approval

    A Florida federal judge said Monday he would sign off on a proposed $12.8 million settlement between Chiquita Brands International Inc. and some of the victims suing the banana company over its funding of Colombian paramilitary groups.

  • June 24, 2024

    Insurer Says Paralympic Org Not Covered In Sex Abuse Row

    The U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee should have no coverage in a lawsuit accusing it of negligence after a Paralympic swimmer said he was sexually abused by a teammate, an insurer for the committee told a Colorado federal court, citing an "absolute abuse or molestation" exclusion. 

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Affirm 6th Circ. Decision Allowing Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected the government's appeal of a Sixth Circuit decision blocking the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' ban on so-called bump stocks, after finding in a separate case that the ATF rule went beyond the agency's authority.

  • June 21, 2024

    Kenyan Firm Says Chicago Attys Blocked Ethiopian Air Fees

    A Kenyan law firm wants an Illinois federal judge to help it get attorney fees after Chicago counsel allegedly shut it out of a former client's Ethiopian Air crash settlement, a request the Chicago attorney blasted Friday as apparent retaliation for aiding an investigation into theft of that client's money.

  • June 21, 2024

    Wrongful Death Suit Against Kiss Members Moves Forward

    A California judge refused Friday to dismiss wrongful death claims against two members of Kiss and their manager alleging a guitar technician caught COVID-19 and died while on tour with the legendary rock back in 2021, according to an attorney for the tech's family and estate.

  • June 21, 2024

    Ga. Panel Revives Cow Car Crash Suit

    A woman who lost an arm after her vehicle hit a cow's body, causing her car to flip over, will get another shot at suing the truck driver who first struck and disabled the bovine on the roadway, a Georgia appeals court ruled Friday, saying a trial is needed to determine if the trucker could have warned others about the obstruction.

  • June 21, 2024

    Meta's Child Porn Defense 'Disingenuous,' MDL Judge Says

    A California federal judge appeared skeptical Friday of Meta's bid to cut child pornography possession allegations from sprawling multidistrict litigation over social media platforms' allegedly addictive designs, telling defense counsel that Meta's claim it didn't know about the illegal content on its platforms is "a bit disingenuous."

Expert Analysis

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

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    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • 3 Surprising Deposition Dangers Attorneys Must Heed

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    Attorneys often do not think of discovery as a particularly risky phase of litigation, but counsel must closely heed some surprisingly strict and frequently overlooked requirements before, during and after depositions that can lead to draconian consequences, says Nate Sabri at Perkins Coie.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Insurers Have A Ch. 11 Voice Following High Court Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Truck Insurance Exchange v. Kaiser Gypsum — which reaffirmed a broad definition of "party in interest" — will give insurers, particularly in mass tort Chapter 11 bankruptcies, more opportunity to protect their interests and identify problems with reorganization plans, says George Singer at Holland & Hart.

  • Justices' Bump Stock Ruling Skirted Deference, Lenity Issues

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    Despite presenting a seemingly classic case on agency deference, the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling last week in Garland v. Cargill did not mention the Chevron doctrine, and the opinion also overlooked whether agency interpretations of federal gun laws should ever receive deference given that they carry criminal penalties, say Tess Saperstein and John Elwood at Arnold & Porter.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Confronting The Psychological Toll Of Personal Injury Law

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    Personal injury lawyers advocate for clients who have experienced trauma, loss and life-altering injuries, but these cases can have an emotional impact on attorneys themselves — so it is crucial to address these challenges proactively and openly, and normalize the conversation around mental health in the legal profession, says Lisa Lanier at Lanier Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Updated Federal Rules Can Improve Product Liability MDLs

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    The recent amendment of a federal evidence rule regarding expert testimony and the proposal of a civil rule on managing early discovery in multidistrict legislation hold great promise for promoting the uniform and efficient processes that high-stakes product liability cases particularly need, say Alan Klein and William Heaston at Duane Morris.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Boeing Saga Underscores Need For Ethical Corporate Culture

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    In the wake of recent allegations about Boeing’s safety culture, and amid the U.S. Department of Justice’s new whistleblower incentives, business leaders should reinvigorate their emphasis on compliance by making clear that long-term profitability requires ethical business practices, says Maxwell Carr-Howard at Dentons.

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