Commercial

  • May 13, 2024

    Colliers Says Outer Boroughs Industrial Leases Jumped In Q1

    Industrial leasing in New York City's outer boroughs picked up in the first quarter, with a film studio leasing in central Queens leading the way, according to an analysis from Colliers.

  • May 10, 2024

    Vegas Hotels, Software Cos. Escape Price-Algorithm Suit

    A Nevada federal judge has permanently tossed a proposed class action that accused two software companies and multiple hotel operators of using an algorithm software in a price-fixing scheme for hotel room prices on the Las Vegas Strip.

  • May 10, 2024

    Boston's Industrial Market Seeing Vacancies Rise

    The vacancy rate of metropolitan Boston's industrial sector rose to 9.8% in 2024's first quarter, which is four percentage points higher than the rate seen at the end of 2021, Colliers reported Friday.

  • May 10, 2024

    Disney World's Lone Independent Resort Gets $734M Refi

    JLL's hotels and hospitality group said Friday that it had arranged a $735 million commercial mortgage-backed securities loan to refinance the Walt Disney Co.'s Swan & Dolphin resort, a 2,619-key property adjacent to theme parks in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.

  • May 10, 2024

    Activist Blasts REIT Buybacks, Hotel Sale During Proxy Fight

    Activist investor Blackwells Capital LLC has sharply criticized a plan by Braemar Hotels & Resorts to sell a California hotel for $165 million and use part of the proceeds for share buybacks as Blackwells is pressuring shareholders to shake up the board of the real estate investment trust at an upcoming meeting.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ex-Wife's Deal With Dallas CRE Firm Ends Kickback Claims

    The former wife of Dallas commercial real estate executive Clifford Fischer has agreed to drop a federal lawsuit accusing Fischer and members of an advisory board to his company of running a scheme to pay themselves unspecified millions in illegal kickbacks for business referrals.

  • May 10, 2024

    NY Judge Won't Toss Lender's Win In 3M Campus Suit

    A New York federal judge refused to reconsider a lender's victory over a loan guarantor who allegedly owed payments for a $64 million loan related to 3M's now-foreclosed Austin, Texas, campus, but found the billing too high when determining attorney fees.

  • May 10, 2024

    3 Takeaways From The Real Deal's New York City Forum

    Industry professionals at The Real Deal's New York City Real Estate Forum this year aired a lot of grievances about housing and development policies in the Big Apple and Empire State, though panels also touched on a major problem facing lenders. 

  • May 10, 2024

    Simpson Thacher, Sheppard Mullin Guide $246M NYC Deal

    Blackstone affiliates offloaded 21 properties surrounding New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport to Terreno Realty Corp. in a $246 million deal guided by Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP and Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP.

  • May 10, 2024

    3 Firms Advise On $250M Great Wolf Waterpark Financing

    VICI Properties Inc. said Friday it has originated a $250 million mezzanine loan as part of $1.5 billion in financing to waterpark operator Great Wolf Resorts Inc., in a transaction advised by Hogan Lovells, Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP and Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft LLP.

  • May 09, 2024

    10th Circ. Appeal May Expand Pollution Coverage In NM

    The Tenth Circuit will hear oral arguments May 20 to determine whether absolute pollution exclusions doom a New Mexico property owner's quest for $120,000 in defense coverage in a case attorneys say could determine the future of such environmental coverage in the state.

  • May 09, 2024

    Vinson-Led EnCap Lands $1.5B For Energy Transition Fund

    Vinson & Elkins LLP advised EnCap Investments LP on a $1.5 billion fund that seeks to invest in projects meant to decarbonize the power industry, as well as in low-carbon fuels and other green ventures.

  • May 09, 2024

    NY Appeals Court Says Parking Garage Is Rent-Stabilized

    A New York state appeals court on May 9 upheld a housing agency's decision finding that a parking garage in a building in the Bronx borough of New York City is rent-stabilized.

  • May 09, 2024

    NY Panel Backs Landlord's Win In Sonder Legionella Case

    A New York appeals court on May 9 mostly upheld a New York City landlord's victory against hospitality company Sonder in a dispute over unpaid rent at a luxury Manhattan apartment building following a Legionella outbreak.

  • May 09, 2024

    CBRE Reports CRE Investment Decline Slowed In Q1

    U.S. commercial real estate investment volume fell less quickly in the first quarter of 2024 than it did at the end of 2023, according to a CBRE report.

  • May 09, 2024

    TPG Lands Nearly $8B Across 3 Asia-Focused Funds

    Private equity giant TPG, advised by Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLP, has closed three Asia-focused funds after securing a combined total of nearly $8 billion from investors.

  • May 09, 2024

    Judge Mulls Twitter's Rent Intent In Colo. Eviction Fight

    A Colorado state judge asked a Boulder landlord Thursday why Twitter's intent mattered when it stopped paying rent after being acquired by Elon Musk, as the landlord fights for access to records to rebut the social media company's wrongful eviction claims.

  • May 09, 2024

    Ore. Tax Court Drops Valuation Of Mobile Home Park

    An Oregon mobile home park should be reduced in value from $2.3 million to $1.7 million because an income analysis presented by the owners reflected the property's real market value better than a local assessor's method, the state's tax court said.

  • May 09, 2024

    Colo. Lawmakers Approve Extended Property Tax Cuts

    Colorado would extend its current temporary property tax rate reductions into 2024 and would lower tax rates for future years under legislation passed by Colorado lawmakers that could save property owners about $1 billion in its first year.

  • May 09, 2024

    Solar Co., Michigan Town Agree To End Zoning Dispute

    A solar energy company has agreed to drop its federal lawsuit accusing a Michigan township of imposing an illegal six-month zoning moratorium against solar projects.

  • May 09, 2024

    Hospital REIT Sees $736M Loss After Tenant's Ch. 11 Filing

    Medical Properties Trust, a healthcare real estate investment trust, lost $736 million in the first quarter of the year from the financial collapse of Steward Health Care, a major tenant, and the write-off of an international joint venture, executives said on May 9.

  • May 09, 2024

    Treasury's Energy Tax Credit Regs Leave Room For 'Chaining'

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury has said it is prohibiting the practice known as chaining that links two new ways to monetize clean energy tax credits, but recent final rules governing the two methods left the door open to possible exceptions.

  • May 09, 2024

    NFL Player-Turned-Atty Can't Appeal After Contempt Deal

    An appeal of a contempt-of-court order by NFL-player-turned-lawyer Walter Bernard is moot because the underlying dispute over unpaid rent has been settled and Bernard has been released from jail, the Pennsylvania Superior Court has ruled.

  • May 09, 2024

    GE Dropped From Louisiana Factory Contamination Suit

    A Louisiana federal judge has dropped General Electric from property owners' suit alleging widespread contamination caused by a now-closed manufacturing facility, finding an earlier merger by a subsidiary did not make the company a liable successor.

  • May 09, 2024

    Designer, Hotelier Sued For Allegedly Duping EB-5 Investors

    Chinese investors in a luxury California hotel for green cards lodged a potential class action Thursday against a prominent interior designer and her hotelier husband for allegedly duping backers into believing Marriott would manage the hotel.

Expert Analysis

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Shifts In The CRE Landscape Demand Creative Loan Solutions

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    An increase in commercial real estate loan workouts makes it critical for borrowers, lenders and other CRE participants to examine all the available options and remedies, including mortgage and mezzanine foreclosures, bankruptcy filings and property short sales, say attorneys at Goulston & Storrs.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • A Smoother Process For CRE Receiverships In Conn.

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    A newly effective Connecticut law concerning distressed commercial real estate provides a number of opportunities and strategic considerations for creditors, and should be watched even by counsel in other states as adoption of the law could become more widespread, say John Loughnane and Steven Coury at White and Williams.

  • What Came Of Texas Legislature's Long-Promised Tax Relief

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    Following promises of historic tax relief made possible by a record budget surplus, the Texas legislative session as a whole was one in which taxpayers that are large businesses could have done somewhat better, but the new legislation is clearly still a positive, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • CRE Guidance Helps Lenders Work With Struggling Borrowers

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    In recognition of growing troubles with commercial real estate loans, four federal regulators' recently updated loan accommodations guidance provides a helpful framework for approaching loan workouts without the punitive results of adverse classifications, say Jaclyn Grodin and Muryum Khalid at Goulston & Storrs.

  • NYC Cannabis Landlord Accountability Law Has Limitations

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    A recently passed bill in New York City, aiming to crack down on the illegal cannabis market by levying fines against landlords who knowingly lease to unlicensed sellers, contains loopholes that may potentially limit the bill’s impact and lead to unintended consequences, say attorneys at Falcon Rappaport.

  • When Investment Banks Can Sell Real Estate In Calif.

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    When investment banks sell businesses that own property in California, they may run into trouble if they are not licensed real estate brokers, unless the property is merely incidental to the deal at hand, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • Hedging Variable Interest Rates In A Volatile Market

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    Variable rate loans, which were an advantageous borrowing method prior to the recent Federal Reserve rate hikes and subsequent volatility, are now the difference between borrowers remaining current on their obligations and defaulting due to the sharply increasing debt service requirements of their loans, say attorneys at Cassin & Cassin.

  • Parsing FTC's Intercontinental-Black Knight Merger Challenge

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent Article III case challenging a merger between Intercontinental Exchange and Black Knight suggests the agency is using a structuralist approach to evaluate the merger's potential anti-competitive harm, says David Evans at Kelley Drye.

  • Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Effectual Relief Questions Linger After Section 363 Ruling

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    In the months since the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in MOAC Mall Holdings, courts and practitioners must grapple with the issue of what effectual relief courts may grant upon an appeal of an unstayed sale order, says Monique Jewett-Brewster at Hopkins Carley.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.